The aerospace sector in México is made-up of more than 300 manufacturing firms and organizations: maintenance-repair-overhaul facilities (MROs), technical schools, research centers, and universities, as well as related service providers. In general terms, 80 percent of all firms are manufacturers, and 20 percent focus on design, engineering and/or MRO services. Although Mexico does not produce large aircraft currently, there is manufacturing for aircraft parts (commercial, private, and military), design and engineering, research and development (R&D), global certifications, and related services. The sector is further divided into original equipment manufacturers (OEMs, producing small final aircraft), companies involved in Tier 1 production (principal aircraft systems), Tier 2 (producers of sub-assemblies), and Tier 3 (parts and supplies). In contrast with the U.S. market, the Mexican aerospace industry does not include local contractors developing entire projects in defense and space; rather, the Mexican niche is for aerospace parts and assemblies that are integrated into final systems.

The Mexican aerospace industry has five main hubs (clusters) located in the states of Baja California (Tijuana-Mexicali), Sonora, Chihuahua, Queretaro, and Nuevo León. Together with an increased number of OEMs and Tier 1 production, we see moderate growth of Tier 2 and Tier 3 suppliers. Aerospace hubs continue receiving new aerospace players interested in Mexico’s attractive logistical advantages, lower labor costs, improved workforce quality and technical training, and government incentives.

México has improved its aerospace manufacturing capabilities, moving from production of components, small parts, and harnesses, to manufacturing of airframes, flight surfaces, and flight control and avionic assemblies. For instance, Aernnova produces airframe and flight structures, GE and Rolls Royce develop new turbine systems, Fokker Aerostructures manufactures wings for jets, and Safran Group—with seven facilities in the State of Queretaro—manufactures landing systems, engine parts, jet engine components, and jet housings, among many other components. Engineering and design activities have been very successful in this industry and have extended to production of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and light aircraft. In the long-term, the Mexican Government and domestic industry seek the production of large commercial aircraft.

Source: Promexico 2019